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Blader Dissection

Blader Dissection

Blader dissection technic during laparoscopic hysterectomy.

What is a Heel Spur - Plantar Fasciitis

What is a Heel Spur - Plantar Fasciitis

One of the most common things a foot and ankle specialists sees in their clinic daily (35% average) is plantar fasciitis. And as arduous as pronouncing this diagnosis, it's well know and patients are coming into the clinic tell me they have it and wondering if they have the dreaded ''heel spur"... Well, as you can see in the foot diagram in the video, the heel spur is actually a calcification of the plantar fascia ligament attachment at the bottom of the calcaneus or heel bone. This 'enthesitis' is in reality accounts for most of the symptoms or 'pain on the bottom of the heel with the first few steps out of bed in the morning'. Treatment consists of rest, stretching, ice, anti inflammatories, night splints, orthotics, cortisone injections, PRP injections, Amnionic cellular implant matrix, and of course surgery. About 60% of the population heals with rest and arch supports as well as the other conservative treatment modalities added to reduce symptoms prior to the surgical option. In my opinion, Custom molded orthotics with or without surgery is the treatment of choice, with stretching in the morning and evening, running shoes, and 1-3 weeks of rest.

Osteology of the scapula

Osteology of the scapula

After completion of this video session, it is expected that you will be able to: Identify and describe surfaces, borders, angles, processes, fossae, and notches of the scapula Identify the location of attachment of muscles and ligaments to the scapula Locate some vessels in relation to the scapula: suprascapular and circumflex scapular vessels Differentiate between the supraglenoid and infraglenoid tubercles in relation to the capsule of the shoulder joint. Outline surface anatomical landmarks in relation to the borders and angles of the scapula Locate the site of palpation of the coracoid and acromion processes. Appreciate that the point of the shoulder is formed by the acromion and not the clavicle Presented and edited by Dr. Akram Jaffar, Ph.D.

Fracture of the clavicle - applied anatomy

Fracture of the clavicle - applied anatomy

After completion of this video session, it is expected that you will be able to: Identify the function of the clavicle. Explain why the clavicle commonly fractures between the middle and lateral thirds. Describe the displacement of fractured fragments. Provide reasons for the displacement of the medial and lateral fragments. Explain why the skin is not penetrated by the jagged end of the bone in spite of the subcutaneous location of the clavicle. Outline some anatomical complications of the fracture. Explain the danger of injuring the axillary vein by the fractured fragments. Explain why clavicular neonatal fracture is common during delivery. Appreciate that a secondary ossification centre at the medial end of the clavicle might be missed for a fracture in an x-ray.

Plantar Fasciosis(Chronic Heel Pain) - Treatment Options

Plantar Fasciosis(Chronic Heel Pain) - Treatment...

Plantar Fasciosis is a term used to describe chronic plantar fasciitis (heel pain). It is a condition characterized by scarring of the plantar fascia. Often patients are left with limited choices dealing with this problem.

How to Read an MRI of a PCL Tear

How to Read an MRI of a PCL Tear

Colorado knee specialist Dr. Robert LaPrade breaks down the specific on how to read an MRI of a PCL tear. This specific case shows an isolated PCL tear. Starting with sagittal images on the lateral side of the knee, you can see the menisci and closer to the midline you can see the anterior cruciate ligament come into view. On the tibial and femoral side you can see there is disruption and fluid at the ends of the PCL. Normally, the PCL is a dark band and in this case it is a lighter color indicating a complete tear. In some cases a medial meniscal root tear can be present with a PCL, so moving more towards the medial side of the knee we want to look for any ghost signs of the medial meniscal root. Continuing to the coronal view we will look for the medial cruciate ligament. In the center, we will be looking for the PCL attachment. You can see increased signal intensity and the disrupted PCL. In this view is is also important to check on the meniscal root attachments when a PCL tear is present. The last image is the axial view. This is useful to evaluate the menisci, identify if there are any bone bruises or any other injured structures. We can also see swelling on the PCL attachment site on the tibia.

Robotic-Assisted Prostatectomy

Robotic-Assisted Prostatectomy

In this video we can see a full robotic-assisted prostatectomy, including new advancements in the surgery. Dr. Patel narrates tips and tricks about this operation.

Cranial Parasympathetic Ganglia

Cranial Parasympathetic Ganglia

After completion of this video session, it is expected that you will be able to: - List the four cranial parasympathetic ganglia: ciliary, pterygopalatine, otic and submandibular, - Identify the location of each ganglion, - Describe the origin of the preganglionic fibers from brain stem nuclei, - Describe the destination of the postganglionic fibers, - Follow the course of pre- and post-ganglionic fibers, - Explain the applied anatomy of gustatory hyperlacrimation (crocodile tears syndrome), Presented and edited by Dr. Akram Jaffar, Ph.D.

Midbrain, Simplified Sections Of Internal Structure

Midbrain, Simplified Sections Of Internal Structure

This video is part of a playlist of videos on the internal structure of the brain stem. In this video, internal structure at the following section levels is described: - Level of inferior colliculus - Level of superior colliculus - Level of lower pons - Level of open medulla - Spinal cord For each fiber tract the location, function, origin and destination are summarized. Each nucleus is identified in terms of location, function and connections. Thus the session correlates anatomical structures seen in the midbrain with those of the pons, medulla oblongata and spinal cord. For this purpose a section of the spinal cord has also been added. After completion of this video session, it is expected that you will be able to develop a three dimensional picture of the gross anatomy of the medulla oblongata and its internal structure. Locate the positions of cranial nerve nuclei and the paths taken by the major ascending and descending nerve tracts. Assess the signs and symptoms presented by the patient and identify the exact location of a lesion affecting the brain stem. Correlate the signs and symptoms of vascular syndromes (Weber's and Benedikt's syndrome) with the nuclei and nerve tracts involved by the vascular lesions. Explain the dissociation of pupillary light reflex from accommodation reflex in central nervous system syphilis (Argyll-Robertson pupil) Presented and edited by Dr. Akram Jaffar, Ph.D.

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