Halitosis: Mere bad breath or something more?

Woman cleaning teeth with toothbrushHalitosis is the term used to describe unpleasant smell coming out from the mouth. This medical condition applies to 50% – 65% of the world population. Despite the prevalence of the affliction is so high, the problem is ignored and treated as a taboo. In about 90% of cases the source of halitosis is located in the oral cavity. A small portion of the problem is caused by disorders that are beyond oral cavity. There is also the phenomenon of psychogenic halitosis. In a variant called pseudo-halitosis there is no unpleasant smell from the mouth, but the patient is convinced of its existence. Worth of mentioning is also the term of halitophobia, when patient experiences exaggerated fear of this disease. Read full text »

,,Green” chemoprevention in oral cancer

Dentist's teeth checkup, series of related photosCancer chemoprevention involves the chronic administration of natural or synthetic substances to reduce or delay the incidence of malignancy. Research team from University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute investigated the potential chemopreventive activity of sulforaphane, compound obtained from broccoli, against carcinogen-induced oral cancer. The study was recently published in the journal Cancer Prevention Research.< Read full text »

A single dose of low-energy laser therapy (LLLT) after third molar extraction as an effective treatment of pain, swelling and trismus

iStock_000006885469_SmallThe extraction of the third molar is one of the most common procedures performed in maxillofacial surgery. This procedure may be associated with post-operative discomfort and in some cases with long convalescence. Most of the complications were: pain, swelling and trismus. They were caused by inflammatory reactions initiated by trauma. There are many methods used to lessen complications after tooth extraction. These include administration of analgesics, anti-inflammatory therapy and low-energy lasers (Low-level Laser Therapy – LLLT). LLLT is a very advantageous solution, because depending on the device parameters (dose and wavelength) it may stimulate a variety of beneficial physiological processes. The use of Low-level Laser Therapy in the field of dentistry is gaining significant credibility. LLLT has supplementing effect on anti-inflammatory drugs, accelerates healing of tissues, allows nerve regeneration following injury, reduces swelling and regulates the immune system response.

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A single dose of low-energy laser therapy (LLLT) after third molar extraction as an effective treatment of pain, swelling and trismus

Woman cleaning teeth with toothbrushThe extraction of the third molar is one of the most common procedures performed in maxillofacial surgery. This procedure may be associated with post-operative discomfort and in some cases with long convalescence. Most of the complications were: pain, swelling and trismus. They were caused by inflammatory reactions initiated by trauma. There are many methods used to lessen complications after tooth extraction. Read full text »

Stem cells and silk to be the ultimate relief for patients suffering from xerostomia?

iStock_000025815091_Full (1)The work of American scientists that was described in the Tissue Engineering Part A issue gives a new hope for millions of patients suffering from the nagging problem of xerostomia. This team of scientists was the first one to design a functional ‘scaffolding’ enabling the development of multipotential stem cells in the direction of the elements of lobules of the salivary glands. Read full text »

Lowbush blueberry as a natural weapon against periodontitis?

iStock_000006885469_SmallDiseases of gingivae and the periodontium pose a serious medical problem in many countries. What is more, this issue concerns a very wide group of patients. In some cases it can even lead to their teeth falling out. The therapy against it requires antibacterial drugs only. This situation might change in the near future thanks to the work of Canadian scientists who have described the phenol components present in the lowbush blueberry as those having both bacteriostatic and anti-inflammatory properties. Read full text »

Sweets for dental health – a new approach to caries prophylaxis

Woman cleaning teeth with toothbrushResearchers in Germany have developed sugar-free candy containing dead bacteria designed to compete with oral cariogenic pathogens. The results of the study are extremely promising. Read full text »

Longevity of root canal treated teeth comparing to implants. Are dentists too eager to extract natural teeth?

Dentist's teeth checkup, series of related photosImplantology – the most dynamically developing branch of dentistry may be responsible for premature and ill-considered teeth extraction. Replacement of natural teeth with implants is often unnecessary and may be a result of dentists’ conformism. Doctors’ contribution to saving teeth is considered much larger and less profitable than performing extractions and an implementation of an implant-prosthetic treatment. Read full text »

Statins for the heart. Statins for the gums.

Statins are effective drugs that lower levels of LDL cholesterol in blood – they reduce the risk of diseases caused by atherosclerosis, such as coronary heart disease. A study conducted by American researchers published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology suggests that statins may help patients with chronic gingivitis and periodontal disease. Read full text »

Diamonds in implantology

Bone loss is a baffling issue accompanying implantology from its very beginning. Researchers at the UCLA School of Dentistry have suggested the use of a new platform for delivering growth factors to the bone in order to obtain a safe and effective regeneration. Diamonds and implantology formed an unusual duetto to fight against osteonecrosis. Will the revolutionary method proposed by the researchers resolve the problem of bone necrosis? Read full text »