The Prevalence Of Mycoplasma In Pregnant Women’s Genital Tracts Delivering In TERTIARY Hospital

Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma urealyticum among pregnant women and an attempt to identify risk factors for maternal infection and assessment of the impact of infection on perinatal outcomes. Material and methods: Patients included into the analysis were divided into 2 groups. The first group consisted of 97 (78.9%) women who had not isolated the strains of Mycoplasma, and the second group of 26 (21.1%) women who had isolated a strain of Mycoplasma. Results: Women who had isolated strains of Mycoplasma were significantly younger (p=0.0031), less frequently completed higher education (p=0.0163), less frequently were married (p=0.0061). Women who were not classified with Mycoplasma were more frequently multiparas (p=0.012) and were more likely to have previous caesarean birth (p=0.022). The groups did not differ significantly in terms of gestational age at birth, the incidence of premature rupture of membranes, intrauterine infection, the percentage of women who gave birth vaginally, the birth weight of newborns and the condition of the newborns after delivery. The neonatal respiratory support type nCPAP was more frequently applied to the babies born to mothers who had isolated Mycoplasma. Conclusions: Based on the survey results and data from the world literature, it can be concluded that women with pre-term labour and PROM should be tested for Mycoplasma colonization and the newborn should be observed primarily in terms of complications caused by respiratory tract. Colonization with Mycoplasma in term pregnancy does not impact significantly maternal and neonatal outcome.

Author:

Zaręba-Szczudlik J, Romejko-Wolniewicz E, Lewandowski Z

Download this article

Comments are currently closed.